Monthly Archives: July 2012

Bad News at the Paper Mill

An article in the WSJ describes some ways that elite universities are cutting back as markets continue to slump. Of particular note: The university is restructuring and consolidating its library system and has told faculty that subscriptions to academic journals, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Silly Surveys: Employment Edition

A new survey has results which are unsurprising but rather useless. Forbes reports: More than one-third of the 444 recent graduates who responded said if they had a do-over, they would have selected majors that connect directly to specific jobs, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Infrastructure Spending

It turns out becoming a wealthy country is difficult. A massive blackout has hit India. Eight states, with a total population of around 369 million people—equal to that of the U.S. and the U.K. combined—were hit by the power outage, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Did Anyone Not See This Coming?

Sometimes I think the only people who hype up tech stocks are tech employees, bankers, and journalists. I don’t know many people who were lining up to buy Groupon or Facebook (question: do you envision a world in which Facebook … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Jobs of the Future: Creating New Markets

The Washington Post has an article up on how a woman leveraged her special knowledge of circumstances to create one of the jobs of the future. he has founded Exfederal.com, a Web site designed to efficiently match government contractors with … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Economists as Futurists

Over at Bigthink there’s a list of brief statements from some economists describing what they see as the future direction of the science. Many of the comments focus on technological changes and it’s worth a read. My own view is … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Wealth on Screen

Ann Hornaday has written up an essay describing how wealth in America is pictured in recent movies. She notes that, in contrast to the Great Depression, films are more somber now. “When I grew up, on a day like today, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment