Monthly Archives: September 2012

Tax Evasion and Self-Employment

A new paper estimates tax evasion in Greece and find that the value of foregone revenues is about 31 percent of the country’s deficit in 2009. Researchers who look at self-reported self-employment income need to be aware of this reporting … Continue reading

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Choices for Federal Spending and Taxes

CBO Director Doug Elmendorf regularly gives presentations on the current an likely future fiscal condition of the Federal Government. They’re an excellent starting point for anyone interested in the subject. His most recent one can be seen here.  

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Tips on Writing Research Articles

From Andrew Gellman. Some very good advice. He gives this general advice with the humorous introduction “Now that the research has been done, I’d recommend rewriting both articles from scratch, using the following template:” 1. Start with the conclusions. Write … Continue reading

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Dealing with Big Numbers

People have difficulty comprehending what large numbers mean (and percentages, as we know from behavioral economics). Over at The Big Picture Barry Ritholtz presents a good method for explaining the meaning of numbers to people by putting them in relative … Continue reading

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Number of Laws Passed by Congresses

Courtesy of the Political Scientists over at the Monkey Cage: Of course, what matters isn’t the quantity of laws but the quality, and it’s not clear that more laws being passed is better. At least they haven’t decided to refuse … Continue reading

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Financial Literacy Among Investors

Franklin Templeton has some results from its Investor Sentiment Surveys. It seems that perceptions often matter more than clear data when people are asked how well the market has done. I’ve graphed the results below, since they’re so striking: To … Continue reading

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Tax Modelling and the Income Distribution

Ezra Klein has an interesting blog post about how the various components of the tax burden vary across the income distribution. He makes this point: As you can see, the poorer you are, the more state and local taxes bite … Continue reading

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